Welcome to our website.  We are in the process of revamping our website, so please be patient and check back often to see the exciting changes. 

 

The North American Voyageur Council (NAVC) is a nonprofit educational organization for individuals interested in various aspects of the fur trade era. Our membership includes researchers, reenactors, living historians, and history buffs, all with the common love of the fur trade.

NAVC invites you to join us in our exploration of this important part of history.

Membership

See what a membership to NAVC can do for you!

Fall Gathering

Check out our annual Fall Gathering – fun and educational!

The Voyageur Journal

Interesting articles on a variety of topics – so much great information!

NAVC Puzzle Sunday
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NAVC Fur Trade ThrowBack Thursday Photo Challenge!!!!
Post a photo of a Tradesman (or Woman) at work in the comment section.
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When Lewis and Clark started on their journey in May 1804, it is estimated they packed approximately 60,000 pounds of cargo on the 55-foot keelboat and two pirogues. Nearly a quarter of that was food in the form of salt, flour, parched corn, salt pork, and portable soup to name a few.

Trade goods made up a lot of their cargo as well and included such things as beads, buttons, mirrors, knives, tomahawks, rings, scissors, fish hooks, shirts, combs, peace medals, and American flags.

Day to day supplies such as clothing, cooking kettles, weapons and ammunition, navigational instruments, and tents were also included.

*Photo: Cutaway keelboat replica on display at the Lewis and Clark State Historic Site, Hartford, IL
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#lewisandclark #lewisandclarktrail #packing #expedition #packingfortheexhibition #keelboat #pirogue #missouririver #travel
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NAVC Puzzle Sunday
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This photo displays some of the trade goods that appealed specifically to female fur trade customers. And although they were keenly savvy traders, did those women have any idea of the global market they helped to propel? The huge variety of glass beads came mainly from Venice. Silk ribbon, along with vermilion, had been shipped across the sea from China. Wool blankets and fabric were woven in England, and trade silver was being manufactured by silversmiths in Montreal. Photo credit: Berit Allison
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Save the Date!

Fall Gathering 2021

November 4-7

Camp Lakamaga

Marine-on-St. Croix, MN